Summary:

The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) has released details of revisions to the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). The revisions will be implemented in 2015 and the exams content and format are described in a, "Preview Guide for the MCAT2015", made available on the AAMC website. In this guide the conceptual framework of the new exam is organised around Foundational Concepts, Content Categories, and Scientific Inquiry and Reasoning Skills.

Article:

The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) has released details of revisions to the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). The revisions will be implemented in 2015 and the exams content and format are described in a, "Preview Guide for the MCAT2015", made available on the AAMC website. In this guide the conceptual framework of the new exam is organised around Foundational Concepts, Content Categories, and Scientific Inquiry and Reasoning Skills. The guide also provides sample test questions, and information about the products and services available to help examinees and others prepare for MCAT2015.
Dr. Darrell G. Kirch, the president and chief executive of the Association of American Medical Colleges, the organisation that administers the test, explains that the changes will enrich the current MCAT exam preserving many elements and eliminating only the elements that no longer work.
“The changes to the MCAT exam, the first since 1991, are designed to help students prepare for a rapidly changing health care system and an evolving body of medical knowledge while addressing the needs of a growing, aging, and increasingly diverse population.”
The AAMC advises that the new version of the test is designed to deliver, ‘a better test for tomorrow’s doctors’. The new MCAT will cover the social and psychological sciences, in addition to biology, chemistry and physics. These changes reflect changes in medical education recognising the importance of socio-cultural and behavioural determinants of health and health outcomes. A new Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills section also reflects that well-rounded applicants from a variety of backgrounds are sought by medical schools.
Almost all U.S. medical schools require applicants to submit MCAT exam scores for entry. The first applicants to sit for MCAT2015 will be those who apply to begin medical school in autumn 2016.
The changes to the MCAT exam were developed by a 21-member advisory panel, the MR5 Advisory Committee, appointed by the AAMC in 2008 to review the exam, which is used for admission to medical school as well as by some other health professions including podiatry and veterinary medicine.
The revisions to the MCAT exam are part of a broader effort by the AAMC and the nation’s medical schools to improve the medical school admissions process.

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