Summary:

The theme of the meeting is "Linking Teaching, Technology and Assessment to Learning."
Medical and graduate education has been advanced by educational scholarship, often supported by technological advances. Learner assessments have been much slower to evolve and occasionally are perceived to hamper educational innovation. The CAS Spring Meeting will review advances in educational scholarship, provide training to meeting participants to advance their own educational skillsets, and discuss how assessment methodologies might evolve to support learners and teachers.

Article:

The theme of the meeting is "Linking Teaching, Technology and Assessment to Learning."
Medical and graduate education has been advanced by educational scholarship, often supported by technological advances. Learner assessments have been much slower to evolve and occasionally are perceived to hamper educational innovation. The CAS Spring Meeting will review advances in educational scholarship, provide training to meeting participants to advance their own educational skillsets, and discuss how assessment methodologies might evolve to support learners and teachers.
Although targeted to the representatives of the 89 academic societies that belong to the CAS, the meeting is open to other faculty and academic society leaders.
Speakers include:
- Carl Wieman, Ph.D., Associate Director of Science, White House Office of Science and Technology (2001 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physics for the production, in 1995 with Eric Cornell, of Bose–Einstein condensate);
- Richard E. Mayer, Ph.D., Professor, Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara;
- William F. Iobst, MD, Vice President of Academic Affairs, American Board of Internal Medicine;
- Robert Englander, M.D., Senior Director for Competency-Based Learning and Assessment, Association of American Medical Colleges;
- Boyd Richards, Ph.D., Director, Center for Education Research and Evaluation, Columbia University Medical Center.

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