Author: Ratnayake L, Parcell B and Phillips G Publication Year: 2013
Summary: Advances in technology have enabled use of teaching techniques such as e-portfolios to deliver infection control and prevention knowledge. This report outlines an assessment of knowledge of basic aspects of infection control among Foundation Year 1 doctors in a large teaching hospital.
Description: Introduction Advances in technology have enabled use of teaching techniques such as e-portfolios to deliver infection control and prevention knowledge. This report outlines an assessment of knowledge of basic aspects of infection control among Foundation Year 1 doctors in a large teaching hospital.

Methods A questionnaire with 20 questions covering various aspects of infection control was given to Foundation Year 1 doctors working in Tayside hospitals during an infection control teaching session. Doctors who had completed the Cleanliness Champions programme and those who had not were included. The percentage of correct answers was determined by using a standardised marking scheme by two independent markers. The data was analysed using Microsoft Excel.

Results Forty seven questionnaires were returned. Six of these were excluded from analysis. Overall mean score was 31.9%. There was no statistically significant difference between the group that had completed the Cleanliness Champions programme and the group that had not. Scores for hand hygiene knowledge had the best overall score with a mean of 72%. For all other questions, mean score was less than 50%. Almost 75% of the doctors understood the meaning of VRE but less than 30% knew CRE, ESBL, PVL or iGAS. Discussion Overall, analysis of the responses showed no difference in the mean score of doctors who completed this programme compared to those who had not. This exercise aimed to help newly qualified doctors identify the gaps in their knowledge of key aspects of infection control with which they could reasonably be expected to be familiar with and utilise in their daily clinical practice.

Conclusion The findings were surprisingly low however; these results will identify areas where additional undergraduate training is needed.

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