Author: Zink T, Dahlman B, Brink D, Solberg E and Markert R Publication Year: 2015
Summary: Literature reviews show little written on the competencies needed for US faculty who teach global health to US medical students. In this paper the authors adopt Srinivasan’s ten teaching competency domains for global health teaching in the medical school and residency settings.
Description: Introduction: Literature reviews show little written on the competencies needed for US faculty who teach global health to US medical students and family medicine residents. The authors, three family medicine physicians with global health expertise and one medical educator, adapted Srinivasan’s ten teaching competency domains for global health teaching in the medical school and residency settings.

Methods: The checklist was developed and self-assessments were completed over several years at two Annual Family Medicine Global Health Conferences and using a listserve with predominantly US Family Medicine physician educators. Srinivasan’s adapted framework was presented to family medicine educators who participated in a workshop at the Annual American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) Global Health Workshop (2013) to further define knowledge, skills, and attitudes important for a comprehensive approach to global health. A modified Delphi process was used to further refine the objectives and finalize the checklist. The finalized 55-item checklist was presented at a workshop at the 2014 AAFP Global Health Workshop for self-assessment of skills as novice, master, or expert for each item. Then, participants self-identified as predominantly novice, master, or expert and broke into groups to discuss faculty development needs.

Results: The 55-item checklist defines the competency objectives for faculty development of educators teaching global health in the medical school and residency setting in the US. While the participants were predominantly family physicians, many of the objectives are relevant to other specialties.

Discussion and next steps: The checklist is a first step in guiding and developing global health educators to train students and residents to deliver culturally appropriate health care in international settings. Self-assessment by more educators is needed for full validation. Initial findings show that faculty who self-identified as novice or master/expert reported different needs. Participants who identified as novices wanted resources to further their medical knowledge, cultural competence, and understanding of public health and health systems in different countries. Masters/experts suggested educational sessions on ethics, tools for program evaluation, resources for funding, leadership development, and program implementation.

Support files: