Author: Losh D, Ambrozy D, Cunningham C, Struijk J, and Scott C Publication Year: 2013
Summary: This paper describes the University of Washington School of Medicine’s (UWSoM) practice of involving clinician observers in high-stakes clinical skills examinations.
Description: This paper describes the University of Washington School of Medicine’s (UWSoM) practice of involving clinician observers in high-stakes clinical skills examinations. Clinician observers were surveyed to ascertain why they consistently volunteer their services to the OSCE program and to understand potential benefits to them and to the medical student examinees. Senior medical students were surveyed after completing their Senior OSCE to ascertain their views of having clinicians directly involved in these high-stakes assessments and the value of the formative feedback they receive immediately following stations involving standardized patients (SP). Qualitative thematic analysis revealed that the most frequently cited reason for volunteering to observe the OSCEs was the opportunity to learn both about the examination, and about the students’ strengths and weaknesses as they interact with SPs. This knowledge, in turn, enables clinician observers to better fulfill their other faculty teaching responsibilities. Students overwhelmingly reported that the personal feedback they receive from clinicians during OSCEs was helpful and that clinicians should continue to be involved as SP station observers.
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