Starting date: Oct 27, 2021 Ending date: Dec 01, 2021 Location: Virtual venue, US Venue: Virtual venue
Summary: This course will review prevalent health education issues for Indigenous populations and equip participants with the contextual historical, political, and social undercurrents shaping contemporary landscapes. Description: COURSE DESCRIPTION


While no monolithic understanding is possible for Indigenous communities around the world, there are nonetheless striking similarities that connect Native communities across the globe, including the impact of colonialism and health disparities, as well as common values and strengths derived from their traditional cultures. This course will review prevalent issues for Indigenous populations and equip participants with the contextual historical, political, and social undercurrents shaping contemporary landscapes. Participants will be invited to consider both unique challenges in their own communities as well as commonalities shared by other communities that can guide iterative learning and collaboration across ecosystems and professions. Lectures led by leaders in Indigenous health policy, advocacy, research, and education will concretize thematic lessons through case studies and best practice examples in Australia, New Zealand, South America, and North America. Furthermore, it will outline possible solutions to address these concerns and serve as a call to arms for all professionals—regardless of Indigenous status—to act as champions of change in this sociopolitical arena.


COURSE OBJECTIVES


1. Participants will be able to define Indigenous health and sovereignty, and recognize their unique connections to sociopolitical, cultural, and physical geographies.

2. Participants will be able to define historical trauma and examine its effect on contemporary issues in Indigenous communities.

3. Participants will be able to identify effective tools and methods for recruiting and retaining Indigenous healthcare workers.

4. Participants will be able to articulate strategies in which non-Indigenous individuals and power systems can act as allies to promote equity for Indigenous people.

5. Participants will be able to illustrate strength-based health promotion practices that allow for provision of culturally competent and nuanced services in the community.


COURSE STRUCTURE


• 6 synchronous modules, 2 hours per module

• Frequency: Weekly

• Interactive


MODULE STRUCTURE

• Readings: Read the 2-3 assigned articles +/- optional additional resources to inform each module theme.

• Lectures: View the pre-recorded lectures/videos for each module.

• Mutual Learning: Post responses to guiding questions based upon pre readings and lectures, read and comment on other participant discussion submissions.

• Application to Local Ecosystem: Each participant will be asked to submit a final project that will serve as a deliverable that can be shared with their own ecosystem or in a larger sphere of influence as appropriate.

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